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Truths, Myths and Needs of Special Diets: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Autism, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity, and Vegetarianism

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dc.contributor.author Cruchet, Sylvia
dc.contributor.author Lucero, Yalda
dc.contributor.author Cornejo, Veronica
dc.date.accessioned 2017-12-15T12:54:18Z
dc.date.available 2017-12-15T12:54:18Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.citation Ann Nutr Metab. 2016;68 Suppl 1:43-50
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11447/1762
dc.identifier.uri http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000445393
dc.description.abstract Different dietary approaches have been attempted for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism, but only three of them have been subjected to clinical trials: education in healthy nutritional habits, supplementation and elimination diets. On the other hand, for multiple reasons, the number of people who adopt vegetarian and gluten-free diets (GFD) increases daily. More recently, a new entity, non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), with a still evolving definition and clinical spectrum, has been described. Although, the benefits of GFD are clearly supported in this condition as well as in celiac disease, in the last two decades, GFD has expanded to a wider population. In this review, we will attempt to clarify, according to the existing evidence, which are the myths and facts of these diets.
dc.format.extent 8
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher Karger
dc.subject Attention deficit
dc.subject Autism
dc.subject Hyperactivity
dc.subject Vegetarianism
dc.subject Gluten
dc.subject Gluten-free diet
dc.subject Food allergy
dc.subject Vegan diets
dc.subject Vitamin B12 deficiency
dc.title Truths, Myths and Needs of Special Diets: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Autism, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity, and Vegetarianism
dc.type Artículo


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